Hays-Heighe House Exhibits & Events

Blending modern with historic, the Hays-Heighe House connects the past to the present, and the future.

Hays-Heighe House’s fall exhibit takes an agro-environmental look at the particulars of our local geology and ecology that have shaped our growth, and how our growth in turn has remade our landscape. To face the coming challenges of climate change, we look back to explore northern Maryland’s history of innovative responses, and forward to the changes we can all make today.

The exhibit is based in part on the life and work of agricultural journalist Russell Lord (1895-1964), as explored by Dr. Margaret Eppig, Director of Natural Resources Education for Maryland Agricultural Education Foundation (MAEF). Russell Lord grew up in Baltimore County, lived in Harford County, and edited a literary journal called The Land, which advocated environmentally responsible agriculture. His wife Kate Lord, a nationally known artist, provided illustrations for his books and for the journal, some based on Harford County’s countryside.

Exhibits and Events

EXHIBIT

Harford County: Our Land & Environment

 
OPENING AND LECTURE

Wednesday, September 8  |  12-4 PM
Reservation not necessary.
Hays-Heighe House’s fall exhibit takes an agro-environmental look at the particulars of our local geology and ecology that have shaped our growth, and how our growth in turn has remade our landscape. To face the coming challenges of climate change, we look back to explore northern Maryland’s history of innovative responses, and forward to the changes we can all make today.

LECTURE:  Russell Lord & The Land 

Wednesday, September 8  |  12:30-1:30 PM  | Room 201
Reservation required.
Presented by Margaret Eppig, Director of Natural Resources Education for Maryland Agricultural Education Foundation, and Lecturer of Environmental Studies at Goucher College.

Agricultural journalist Russell Lord grew up in Baltimore County, lived in Harford County, and advocated environmentally responsible agriculture decades before the advent of the modern environmental movement. He edited The Land, a literary journal published in Bel Air that included works by Gifford Pinchot, Aldo Leopold, and Rachel Carson.

ROOTED IN HARFORD COUNTY:  FINDING LOCAL FARMS

Thursday, September 16  |  12:30-1:30 PM  |  Room 201
Reservation required.
Presented by Shaorn Stowers, professor of sociology at Harford Community College

Farms are the heart of Harford County’s rural landscape, and the fall harvest is a great time to discover the variety of local products available!  Hear about Professor Sharon Stowers’ work to build bridges between local farmers and the wider community, and learn how to use Harford County’s “Farm Finder” App.

APRIL SHOWERS: RAIN GARDENS AND OTHER STRATEGIES

Thursday, September 23  |  12:30-1:30 PM | Room 201
Reservation required.
Presented by Kelsey Brooks, Regional Watershed Restoration Specialist, UMD

April showers bring May flowers, but as our climate changes here in Maryland, we expect heavier rains. Rain gardens, bioswales, and other modifications can capture that runoff, keeping nutrients from washing toward the bay, and recharging our groundwater. 
 

LIVING HISTORY:  RACHEL CARSON

Thursday, September 30  |  12:30-1:30 PM | Room 201
Reservation required.
Presented by Colleen Webster, professor of literature at Harford Community College

Colleen Webster presents a one-woman show about the scientist and author who ignited the modern environmental movement. This performance highlights Rachel Carson’s research, personal life and legacy, which we still enjoy today along the Chesapeake Bay.

SAVE OUR SOIL

Thursday, October 7  |  12:30-1:30 PM  |  Room 201
Reservation required.
Presented by Quintin Cornwell, Harford County Soil Conservation District Manager

In the decade of the Dust Bowl, President Franklin Roosevelt argued that “a nation that destroys its soil destroys itself,” and he created the Soil Conservation Service. Why kick up so much dust over a little dirt? Learn the importance of our soil and strategies to protect your property. 

CAMPUS WALK

Thursday, October 14  |  12:30–1:30 PM  |  Meet at HHH
Reservation required.
Harford Community College’s campus is a carefully managed landscape. Walk with us to see environmentally-friendly features here and learn more about the beautiful trees, and where to spot wildflowers and wildlife.

POETRY READING: “Admit that the Waters Around You Have Grown”

Thursday, October 21  |  12:30-1:30 PM  |  Room 201
Reservation required.
Presented by Colleen Webster, Professor of Literature at Harford Community College

This poetry reading focuses on the landscape, the environment, and climate change. What floats your boat? Bring in favorites that you have already harvested, or root through the material provided to bring something to life.


CAMPUS WALK

Thursday, October 28  |  12:30–1:30 PM  |  Meet at HHH
Reservation required.

Harford Community College’s campus is a carefully managed landscape. Walk with us to see environmentally-friendly features here and learn more about the beautiful trees, and where to spot wildflowers and wildlife.

JUST WHAT IS COMMUNITY SUPPORTED AGRICULTURE

Thursday, November 4  |  12:30-1:30 PM  |  Room 201
Reservation required.
Discussion led by Sharon Stowers, professor of sociology at Harford Community College.

Did you know you can guarantee your access to the freshest local produce and help to sustain our local farms?  Participate in a panel discussion with local farmers who offer CSAs, and with some of their happy customers.  Learn about these great programs, and consider signing up in the spring!

PRESERVING HARFORD COUNTY’S LANDSCAPE AND CHARACTER

Thursday, November 18  |  12:30-1:30 PM  |  Room 201
Reservation required.
Presented by William D. Amoss, Agricultural Land Preservationist

Quiet roads through rolling hills of agricultural fields dotted with farmhouses, barns, and outbuildings – to many, that’s quintessential Harford County. A variety of different programs here and in Maryland as a whole help to preserve this character.

In light of the continued circulation of the coronavirus and potential emergence of new variants, we are still strategizing how to safely bring you this popular program. The theme for Fall 2021 is Beas and Teas, and we hope to hold several of them on Tuesdays in October and November. Look for updates on the teas on our website and in follow up mailings.