Front View of Hays-Heighe House

Events

"Faces of Freedom: The Upper Chesapeake, Maryland, and Beyond" events:

* All events are free of charge and take place on the campus of Harford Community College (unless noted). Some events require registration in advance.


Twelve Years a Slave – Book Discussion

Susan Muaddi-Darraj, M.A.
April 11, *12:30 PM - 2:00PM (corrected time)
Hays-Heighe House Room 201
Seating is limited, and registration is required. To reserve a seat, please email HaysHeighe@harford.edu or call 443-412-2539.

The book discussion focuses on the 1853 stirring memoir of Solomon Northrop, born free but kidnapped, sold into slavery and held in bondage for 12 years, which inspired the 2013 film version of Northrop’s story.

The Goophered Grapevine and Other Stories – Book Discussion

Dorothy Miller, Ed.D.
Tuesday, April 15, 11:45 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Hays-Heighe House Room 201
Seating is limited, and registration is required. To reserve a seat, please email HaysHeighe@harford.edu or call 443-412-2539.

The discussion will focus on short stories by African American author, essayist and political activist Charles Waddell Chestnutt, in which he explores racism and other social themes from the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

Uncle Tom: Exemplar of Freedom – Lecture & Discussion

W.B. Allen, Ph.D.
Monday, April 21, 12:30 to 1:30 p.m.
Student Center Room 243
Seating is limited. To reserve a seat, please email HaysHeighe@harford.edu or call 443-412-2539.

Learn why Allen (author of Rethinking Uncle Tom: The Political Philosophy of Harriet Beecher Stowe) describes the fictional character Uncle Tom as an exemplar of human freedom and discuss his account of the political thought underlying Stowe’s work.

Souls of Black Folk – Book Discussion

Karry Hathaway, Ph.D.
Friday, May 2, 12:30 to 1:45 p.m.
Hays-Heighe House Room 201
Seating is limited, and registration is required. To reserve a seat, please email HaysHeighe@harford.edu or call 443-412-2539.

The discussion focuses on W.E.B. DuBois’ classic work in the literature of black protest, in which DuBois insists on the fundamental dignity of human beings at a time when America was reconstructing and redefining itself the wake of the Civil War.

previous

next


Faces of Freedom was made possible by a grant from the Maryland Humanities Council through support from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in the performance, lectures, films and discussions do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities or the Maryland Humanities Council.

Share